Michael Greenstone

Michael Greenstone is the 3M Professor of Environmental Economics in the Department of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a Non-Resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), an Elected Member to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is on the MIT Energy Initiative’s Energy Council. His research estimates the costs and benefits of environmental quality and society’s energy choices, and he is currently engaged in large-scale projects to estimate the economic costs of climate change and identify efficient solutions. His research is also increasingly focused on developing countries and he is engaged in projects with the Government of India and three state governments to test innovative ways to improve the functioning of environmental regulations and increase energy access. He also has extensive policy experience, having served as the Chief Economist for President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisors from 2009-2010 and as the Director of the Hamilton Project at the Brookings Institution that studies a range of policies to promote economic growth from 2010-2013, and has since joined its Advisory Council. He has also served as an editor of the Review of Economics and Statistics and as a member of the EPA Science Advisory Board’s Environmental Economics Advisory Committee. He received his Ph.D. in Economics from Princeton University and his BA in Economics with high honors from Swarthmore College.

Research Grant Projects

This project tests whether greater knowledge of pollution data, for regulators and for the public, can make regulation more effective in the Indian energy sector.
This project seeks to provide experimental evidence on the relationship between electricity supply and small business creation and growth.
Together with Indian environmental regulators, the research team investigates whether public disclosure of information on industrial emissions and the use of information technology can improve regulatory performance, industrial compliance, and industrial efficiency.